Wednesday’s Words and Wit from the Presidential Campaign Trail: 11/30/11

Bookmark and Share    Today Trunkline 2012 brings you some good and bad news for Newt, Michele Bachmann’s strong stance against extending the payroll tax holiday, Herman Cain’s decision to make a decision about keeping his going , Mitt Romney’s attempt to prevent Newt from passing him by, Chris Christie’s attempt to prove that Mitt is the man, Allen West on  becoming the next Vice President and more tid-bits from the campaign trail.

Mitt Romney  MittRomney   Mitt Romney

The right answer for America is to stop the growth of government & start the growth of the private sector. VIDEO: http://mi.tt/tQmwch
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  • Quote of the Day: 

“Real leadership is not what you see in the White House right now. I think it’s a sad day in our country’s history to have a bystander in the Oval Office, and that’s we have.”   NJ Governor Chris Christie during a meeting of the RGA on 11/30/11

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Why The Tea Party Debate Matters

Picture From The First Tea Party Sponsored Presidential Debate

Sizing Up At The First Tea Party Sponsored Presidential Debate

Bookmark and Share    On September 12, 2011, The Tea Party co-sponsored a G.O.P. Presidential Debate in Tampa, Florida.  Though there have been and will be many more opportunities to see the G.O.P. presidential hopefuls duke it out for the top spot as the Party nominee, tonight’s debate bares particular importance.  The Republican party has not had to gauge the temperature of constituents so disgusted and so organized.  If any Republican hopeful wants to make it into the Whitehouse in 2012, they will have to go through the tea party. 

Nothing made this more evident than the mid-term elections of 2010.  After the disappointing passage of Obama’s healthcare bill, the Tea Party started to swell.  Understanding there would be more power staying in the Republican Party than leaving to become a third-party (as shown by the Libertarian Party),  the Tea Party hand-picked and back candidates all over the country to run for congress, state, and local elections all over the nation.  They did so successfully, particularly in the South (which matters because of the importance of the South Carolina primary).  Several incumbent, career politicians found out they were going to become unemployed during state primaries all summer of 2010.  It was a reminder to all of a great political-insider mantra: all politics is local.  Primary winners for the Republican Party spanned the gambit.  Sarah Palin  became the unsung superhero for the Tea Party movement; endorsing candidates all over the country with Tea Party power in her utility belt.   From dark horse Christine O’ Donnell with The Wicca scandal, to new comer Allen West becoming the first black Florida congressman since reconstruction, the Tea Party voters made the difference in these political contests.  In primaries, they were the deciding factor.  If a candidate can’t strategize past a primary, strategizing for a general election is in vain.

Why is this so? Essentially, the Tea Party vote is significant enough to hijack primaries.  With Republicans winning majority in The House of Representatives in the last election cycle, crypt-keeper reminiscent, RINO Republicans and the status quo took note.   With the corruption perceived corruption of campaign finance and lobbyist, the equalizer is still our constitutional right which equates one man to one vote without regard to socio-economic status, gender, ethnicity or creed. The 2012 primaries will be referendums by Tea Party supporters on who would best serve as the next POTUS.  The Tea Party can no longer be dismissed.  They are the voice of reckoning.  No matter what one’s sentiment is toward tea party issues, activists or voters,  the truth of the matter will be this:  the candidate that can garner and sustain Tea Party support throughout the primary will most likely be the candidate that meets Obama in the general election.  Debates that tout tea party connections and involvement will serve as the litmus test for all the contenders.

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Daily Tweet: Col. Allen West Takes on President Obama

Bookmark and Share The best tweet of the day comes from Congressman Allen West who in regards to the rhetoric being used byPresident Obama’s to defend hisunwillingness to appropriately confront our nation’s spending addiction and mounting national debt, tweeted; “This demagoguery must be met head on. Now is not the time for class warfare, arrogance in leadership or political incompetence in America.”

As usual, Col. West is right and thankfully he has the courage to tell it like it is and not dance around the truth!

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White House 2012 Word Search Puzzle for Week of March 6, 2011

Find these Freshmen Republican Names

Game 2

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Click Here For the Answers

Will 2012 Ruin 2016?

In 1996, after Democrat President Bill Clinton had embarked on a regime so liberal that he swept Newt Gingrich and Republicans into power in 1994, it seemed for Republicans that it was Bob Dole’s time. However, with Republicans being frowned upon for shutting down the government and Clinton getting credit for reigning in spending, Bob Dole’s clear path became more and more difficult. It didn’t help that a third party candidate was stealing GOP votes or that Dole showed the charisma and enthusiasm of Fred Thompson at 3 in the afternoon.

In 2012 things may not be so different.

Noemie Emery writes in the Washington Examiner that the class of 2012 for Republican candidates may be the weak link in the GOP ascendancy. CPAC showed just how deep a divide exists between the different brands of Republicanism. None of the current field is an across the board favorite, and as I mentioned last week even Mitt Romney scares some conservatives.

Contrasted with the candidates who could be prominent in 2016, the 2012 class seems dull and divisive. As Emery points out, 2016 could see figures who have emerged as highly popular among conservatives and have already proven themselves as leaders. She mentions Marco Rubio. I would add Rand Paul, Scott Walker, Rick Scott, Chris Christie, Allen West, Mike Pence, Jim DeMint, and Paul Ryan to that list.

Each of these politicians have become rock stars among the conservatives in their constituency and are starting to build national respect.

As wide as the 2012 field appears right now, it may end up being the year of lost potential. Many candidates who could have injected the young vibrancy of the conservative resurgence into 2012 have made other commitments. Mike Pence will likely run for governor of Indiana. Chris Christie is staying put in New Jersey. The candidate who best embodies the conservative values that swept into Congress in 2010 also happens to be one of the most divisive among conservatives in Sarah Palin.

So what about Emery’s suggestion that Republicans would be better off losing in 2012? Honestly I don’t think we can afford to lose in 2012. And when I say we can’t afford it, I don’t just mean the Republican party.

 

Thanks to a friend who posted the Emery article at u4prez.com

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