Rookie Republican Governors May Shape 2012 Debate

Governor Rick Scott will not be a candidate in 2012. But his actions in the first two months of his governorship will help mold the 2012 debate. In fact, success among conservative governors like him could spell doom for establishment candidates in 2012. Governor Scott is already facing opposition from establishment Republicans in Florida over his hot-off-the-presses budget.

Scott is cutting spending by $5 billion in Florida. This includes pension reform for government workers, merit pay for teachers, firing bad teachers, cutting non-essential services and streamlining government. It also includes eliminating Florida’s business tax by 2018 and cutting property taxes. Every special interest group and person who collects a state paycheck hates him right now.

Rick Scott is emblematic of the new Conservative outsider paradigm

Scott is following a path laid down by Chris Christie in New Jersey and Bob McDonnell in Virginia. And he is joined by many freshmen GOP governors who are rejecting the Keynesian model of stimulus debt spending and returning to the conservative model of cutting government spending and giving the money back to businesses and individuals who actually produce growth.

This is something the GOP majority is struggling with in the fog of Washington politics. While abstractly they have a plan to cut spending by $2.5 trillion over ten years, the House struggled to find $32 billion to cut in this year’s budget.

If the bold, conservative governors who stormed our state capitals in 2008 and 2010 are successful in fixing their state budgets and creating a stark contrast with other more liberal states, the GOP candidate for President will likely be one who can credibly claim to come from the same mold. This will favor potential candidates like Christie, Jindal, and Barbour. If he makes the right moves, Romney may also be able to attach his name to the outsider, conservative governor genre. It may not be good news for potential Senators and House members whose good ideas will be frustrated by Democrat leaders and Republican moderates.

Jindal’s November Book Release Is Timed Just Right

Governor Bobby Jindal and local officials flyover

Governor Jindal Addresses BP Oil Disaster Before the Press

Bookmark and Share    It has become tradition that before you run for President of the United States, you must write a book.  The book usually plots the path that America should take for brighter and more prosperous according to its author, the future presidential candidate. Along the way, the book also often makes biographical references to the life of the future candidate and some of the events that shaped their thinking.

This has essentially become a part of the process, a sort of prerequisite that gets a perspective candidate for a presidential nomination same name ID and a basis of understanding for readers to get know all about the man or woman who will be seeking their vote.

Well it would seem that Louisiana’s first term Governor is following in this tradition.

Originally slated to come out in July, Governor Jindal’s book is now coming out in November. He and the co-author of his collection of concepts, policies, beliefs and biographical history were thrown a bit off schedule due to the Gulf Oil spoil calamity that took place earlier this year..

The timing though couldn’t be better. Soon after November’s midterm elections, once the makeup of the political landscape for the next two years is established, the presidential shuffle will begin. Republicans will begin to maneuver their way through the issues and Party leadership and start to position themselves for a run for the GOP presidential nomination. What better way to have your known thrown into the mix than have your book hit the shelves just at the moment that the discussion about the 2012 presidential election takes place.

Jindal’s presidential fortunes are not exactly as great as others are yet but he does a substantial platform from which an aggressive campaign could allow him to be quite viable in the Republican primaries. In 2008, he was ranked one of the nation’s most popular governors with an approval rating of 77%. Since then, although he took a hit from what was widely characterized as a poor national response President Obama’s 2009 State of the Union Address, Jindal has lost some of his glow, but not much. It is quite hard to maintain a 77% approval rating, a number that is normally reserved for wartime President’s. But Jindal has remained popular and his name has been out there more than most governors.

His handling of wicked hurricanes in the wake of the utterly disgraceful of Katrina by the previous Democrat Administration of Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco, has helped to show Jindal to be a true leader and confident organizer and steward in times of crisis. This impression was only solidified by his handling of the BP oil gusher that produced the greatest manmade ecological disaster in U.S. history. Jindal’s stand against the Obama Administration’s slow reaction and lack of sufficient action in the wake of the rig explosion, helped to contrast Jindal’s own quick reactions and successful efforts to prevent the oil from polluting his Louisiana shores.

But in addition to proving his competence and leadership during times of crisis, Jindal has also demonstrated a steady hand of management and leadership in other areas such as the economy. As a strong fiscal conservative, Jindal has whipped Louisiana’a budget and fiscal condition into far better shape than any of his recent predecessors. Something which has not been an easy fete for a state whose largest city and greatest tourist attraction, New Orleans, is still recovering from the devastation of Katrina while also having to deal with an Obama led moratorium on offshore oil drilling that is killing jobs and the oil spill which devastated the Louisiana fishing and shrimping industries as well as coastal tourism.

In the midst of all this, is the novelty of Jindal’s personal story. He is currently the youngest Governor in America and the first ands only Indian-American Governor in the United States.

All of this can certainly make for a compelling book but is certainly an interesting story, one that can capture the hearts and imaginations of the American electorate, if told right.

After all not all stories get told properly.   After Nancy Pelosi rose to the position of Speaker of the House and became the most powerful and highest elected woman official in U.S. history, when her story was translated into a book, despite all the hype, it was an embarrassing flop that cost more to produce and promote than were made through its sales.

Whether Jindal’s book goes over big or not, there is no denying that he is making sure that all windows of opportunity remain open to him. The November release of his book is just one indication of that but his record and personal story are the real sellers when it comes to 2012 and if the sales pitch isn’t for President, can you say “Vice President Jinda?”. Northern nominees like Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Sarah Palin sure can.

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