Mitt Romney Wants Sarah Palin to Run for President

Bookmark and Share    In an interview with USA Today’s Susan Page, Mitt Romney states that he hopes Sarah Palin runs for President.

According to Romney;

“I think it would be a good thing if she did. She would make the race that much more exciting, bring more people to watch the debates, and I hope she gets in.”

Romney is totally correct on those points.

Palin’s entry into the race would have an incredibly positive affect for Republicans in the 2012 election. It will especially take a lot of ink away from President Obama.

However Romney does not mention the real reason why he would like Palin to run.

With Sarah Palin in the nomination contest, candidates like Rick Perry, Rick Santorum, Michele Bachmann, and Herman Cain, will have their vote totals suppressed by Palin’s candidacy which will absorb much of their support. And while she holds down the vote totals of candidate like Bachmann and Perry, Romney has a good chance to see his establishment conservative vote totals surpass all others and wrap up the nomination earlier rather than later.

Of course, with Palin running, there is also a good chance that Romney will lose…………..to her.

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Palin’s Presidential Write-In Candidacy

Bookmark and Share    Sarah Palin had originally indicated that she would make a decision about a run for President in 2012 by the end of September. Yet in a recent interview with Sean Hannity she seemed to indicate that her decision might not come until November. When asked about her intentions and after being reminded by Sean Hannity that crunch time is approaching soon, Governor Palin responded by stating;

“There is still time, Sean, and I think on both sides of the aisle you’re going to see people coming and going from this race,”

According to Palin;

“In the Republican race, in this primary, I think people are still going to be coming and going because there is still time. And I’m still one of those still considering the time factor.”

When Hannity asked she didn’t need to make a decision by November, her response was;

“You do, legally you do, because you have start getting your ducks lined up to have your name on these ballots.”

But probably the most telling comment she made during her interview was;

“This is going to be such an unconventional election cycle. … Mark my word, it is going to be an unconventional type of election process.”

Trying to dissect Palin’s words is probably futile. The former Governor and Vice Presidential nominee is keenly aware that her every word is scrutinized, and from them are extrapolated some wild hypotheses . As such, she quite smartly, and intentionally throws out phrases that keep speculation about her front and center.

But there are several realities that can’t be denied. The most glaring one is that if Governor Palin intends to run, in order to get her name on the ballot in South Carolina and Florida, she must make her candidacy official and file the proper paperwork within the next 5 ½ weeks.

Or does she?

As Palin said in her interview, “Mark my word, it is going to be an unconventional type of election process.”

When it comes to unconventional, Sarah Palin is the quintessential queen of unconvential. No politician is as unconventional as her. And while some suggest that her unpredictable nature makes her an unlikely political leader, it can not be denied that much of Palin’s popularity is based on her unconventional tendencies. It is what makes her the anti-establishment candidate at a time when the popular TEA movement that decided the 2010 midterm elections, is looking for an anti-establishmentarian figure to lead our nation.

So what could Palin have meant when after admitting that by typical legal standards, one would have to make a decision about the presidential election soon, but then suggested that this election is not going to be typical?

It is true that Palin would have to make her candidacy officially within the next several weeks if she intended to have ballot access in the South Carolina and Florida primaries. But it is also true that Palin could still win both those contests without appearing on the ballot. If an aggressive write-in effort were waged, Palin could actually catapult herself into frontrunner status and turn this election on its ear. That would certainly live up to her promise that we are about to enter into “an unconventional type of election process.”

To help make that promise come to fruition, Palin could remain an undeclared presidential candidate and continue to draw thousands to the appearances she she is already making around the country. But with a shifted focus on visits to Iowa, South Carolina, and Florida, and a few additional words, she could be in this race until the Republican national convention concludes.

With all the talk about Republicans not being very confident or excited by any of the existing candidates, Palin can appeal to those dissatisfied Republicans, and TEA movement voters by remaining the anti-establishment Republican. She can simply suggest that if you really want to send a message to Republicans and Democrats alike, we should think outside of the box that the establishment has put us in and do not limit ourselves to the candidates that the two Parties offer. And then all Palin needs to say is……

“Write in the name of the person you want to lead this nation, don’t just mark off one of the names that the Party machine allows you to choose from”.

From then on, a movement will be born, a movement that will make writing Sarah Palin’s name in as a symbol of protest and dissatisfaction with the establishment……of both Parties.

In the end, Governor Palin may not be able to win the nomination solely as a write-in candidate, but it could also be that Governor Palin does not intend to be President. Such an effort could simply be an ingenious way for her to insure that her voice is heard and that she continues to influence politics in the way that she intends to………… by keeping the establishment on their toes and preaching the virtues of limited government and bountiful freedom.

Then again, no one can say that Palin would have to remain simply a protest vote. A strong write-in candidacy could actually provide Palin with enough delegates to significantly influence such things as who the next vice presidential nominee is and numerous planks in the Republican Party’s platform. And if this happens to be a very close nomination contest, she could even garner enough delegates to select who the next presidential nominee is.

But that’s not to say that Palin won’t be the next President herself.

If her promise of an unconventional election bears out to mean a Palin write-in candidacy, a strong showing in Florida or South Carolina as a write-in candidate could create enough waves to propel her ahead of the official candidates. If that were to happen, all bets are off.

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Why Palin?

Bookmark and Share    The current Republican presidential contest remains in flux. One of the reasons for that is due to the anticipation of several more potentially, politically potent, candidates into the race……….Sarah Palin and Rick Perry. Part of the reason so many are taking this wait and see attitude is due to a lack of enthusiasm for any of those who we know are running.

That said, I do not subscribe to the school of thought that suggests that the current field of Republican candidates for President has no giants in it. I maintain the position that after a long and hard fought campaign, one of them will rise to the top and along the way, they will become so admired, so appreciated that on Election Day 2012, people will enthusiastically go to the polls to support them. I find many positive things in each of the candidates and could easily get behind someone like Romney, who I supported in 2008. I could also easily get behind someone like Michele Bachmann, Rick Santorum, Tim Pawlenty or Newt Gingrich. On top of that I do not underestimate the magic that a well run campaign can produce.

Still, no matter how many excuses I make for a lack of popular energy for the existing candidates  it is still true that there is an enthusiasm gap.  But that is not the case with one name who may still enter the race.

Sarah Palin.

Of all the candidates and potential candidates, I find that Sarah Palin is the only potential presidential nominee who already inspires a great sense of enthusiasm within me and tensa of millions of others.  More so than any of the other conceivable nominees, Palin not only has a humongous loyal following, she has an immense and extremely energetic following and her popularity far exceeds that of any of her possible opponents.

Take for example Sarah Pain’s Facebook page. Facebook may not be the best barometer of political opinion, but its preeminence in contemporary internet communication offers a good idea of popularity.

Of the still evolving Republican field of candidates Sarah Palin’s fan base exceeds her nearest opponent by 2,140,214 people. Here’s a breakdown:

But putting those numbers and pop culture aside, there is no doubt that Sarah Palin energizes the base of the Republican Party. She provided whatever energy there was in John McCain’s doomed 2008 presidential campaign and since then, Sarah Palin has increased her role and visibility as a leading voice for constitutionalism and fiscal sanity.

Still, many believe that Palin can never win. They believe that even if she were to enter the race and somehow win the Republican nomination, she would be slaughtered in the general election. I am not so sure of that.

Despite left wing attempts to paint TEA Party enthusiasts to terrorists and equate them to kamikaze pilots, most Americans are coming around to the realization that government has become too big and spends too much and that Washington, D.C. bureaucrats have little ability to turn things around. Such a view fits right in to the message that Sarah Palin has been offering long before she was ever asked to run for Vice President. At the same time, few people are seen as having the resolve to do exactly as they say, as much as Palin does. People know she holds no punches and is not your typical politician. These quality are great positive contrasts to our current President.

So when it comes to the general election, some people may claim that Palin’s greatest liability is that she is too extreme. While many claim that this may destroy her chances of winning the general election, I contend that on the issue of the economy, Palin’s extremism is an asset. The economy is more than likely going to remain the number one issue. It is also likely that people will want a President who is willing to lead on the economy and not play the same old political games that both the left and right play when they come in to office. Palin has convincingly demonstrated that she would not be a politics-as-usual President. When she says that she would cut the budget, few doubt that she would, even if Congress fights her on it.

And insofar as other issues go, few if any conservative Republicans doubt Palin’s conviction to conservative values. This is not an issue which Palin would need to campaign on. If the religious right doubts Palin’s moral compass and faith, then they would probably doubt Jesus himself. The truth is that among the conservative base Palin need not prove she is conservative enough. This puts Palin in a perfect position to focus on the preeminent issue of the day………the economy. If she were to pursue the Republican presidential nomination, she need not be distracted by any other issue. At the same time Palin is in a perfect position to argue that on social issues, she maintains the most conservative position of all her opponents. Palin believes in the Constitution and her limited government values force her to hold the conservative position that government does not belong in our bedrooms. Take for instance Palin’s veto of the Alaska state legislature’s attempt to preclude the same-sex spouses of state employees from receiving state benefits. Despite Palin’s own personal opposition to same-sex marriage, she refused to allow the state legislature to deny these benefits on the grounds that it was discriminatory and unconstitutional. In other words, Palin believes that the Constitution settles political debates, not personal opinions. That is conservative. But it is also a conservative view that liberals and moderates should be able to appreciate.

The bottom-line is that if Sarah Palin does decide to run for the Republican presidential nomination, she should not be underestimated. Over the past two years, not only has she increased in popularity, she has also become one of the most vetted possible presidential candidates in history. Every aspect of her life has been under endless assault ever since she was first nominated for Vice President in 2008. The media has never let up on scrutinizing her every move and every word. From her clothing, to her family and even her personal emails, everything Palin-related has been dissected, investigated, examined, commented on and publicized. And what has come out to damage her? Nothing.

Ultimately, unlike the current existing field, Palin’s leadership has been inspiring. For me, the last time that there existed a potential candidate for President who inspired me was in 1988 when former Congressman and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development  Jack F. Kempran in the Republican primary. Kemp’s candidacy help draw me in to a life and career of conservative politics. Of course it must be mentioned that despite the inspiration, Kemp did not make it past New Hampshire. He lost to George “Read My Lips” Bush. But four years later President George H.W. Bush was denied reelection. Many voters were not happy with the fact that Bush broke his promise and caved to liberal calls for tax increases. So in retrospect they might have actually been much happier with the strength and conviction of Jack Kemp more than that of George H.W. Bush. That may perhaps be a lesson for Republicans to remember if Sarah does decide to run.

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For Republicans, the First Step Is the Primary Within the Primary

Bookmark and Share    As we finally begin to understand what the likely field of Republican presidential candidates will look like, it is becoming clear that the same dynamics which influenced the 2010 Republican primaries and general election, are likely to play a significant role in the 2012 Republican presidential nominating contest. In 2010, the influence of a strong TEA movement, shaped the platform that incumbents ran on, and determined the outcomes of many primary contests. The now former Congressman from Delaware, Mike Castle, is one of the most notable people who can attest to that.

In Delaware’s Republican U.S. Senate primary, Castle, a former Governor of the state, was an establishment candidate. He was defeated by Christine O’Donnell who, for better or worse, was the anti-establishment candidate. In Nevada, Sharron Angle, another anti-establishment candidate, defeated a number of other establishment Republicans in her attempt to win the G.O.P. nomination. In both cases, those ladies may have lost their general election races, but many other anti-establishment candidates, won both the Party nomination and their general elections. There was Marco Rubio,  Rick Scott, Daniel Webster, and Allen West in Florida, Tim Johnson in Wisconsin, Niki Haley in South Carolina, New Mexico’s Susana Martinez and many more, including hundreds more on the county and local levels. Ultimately, the TEA movement brewed a potent formula that is still infusing itself in to the electoral and legislative process and it will continue to do so in the nomination process of the next Republican presidential candidate.

The same anti-establishment sentiment that propelled statewide and local candidates to victory in 2010 is going to again play itself out in presidential primaries and pit the anti-establishment against the establishment. In fact, in many ways, the race to nominate a Republican presidential candidate is likely to come down to two people……..the establishment candidate and the anti-establishment candidate. Consider it a primary within the primary.

On the establishment side, you have frontrunner Mitt Romney, followed by Tim Pawlenty, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Jon Huntsman, and possibly other major players like Texas Governor Rick Perry, along with minor candidates like former Governors Buddy Roemer, George Pataki, Bob Riley and possibly even former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. In the end though, the establishment primary will really be only between Romney, Gingrich, Santorum, Pawlenty and if he runs, Rick Perry.

As for the anti-establishment primary, who will be competing in this field is still a bit unsettled. With names like Bachmann and Palin not yet in the race but seriously considering it, this inner-primary has yet to take shape. At the moment, Herman Cain is the anti-establishmentarian frontrunner. Competing against Cain is former two term New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson and Texas Congressman Ron Paul.  Both Paul and Johnson have a very low ceilings of support, but we have yet to see how high the roof on Herman Cain’s popularity is.

While Cain has a definite ability to outperform both Johnson and Paul, the entry of Bachmann and/or Palin in to the race, will give Cain a good run for whatever money he can raise.

On the establishment side, while Romney has the inside track, he can easily be thrown off pace and with the specter of RomneyCare hanging around his neck, he could be quickly overcome by Pawlenty, Gingrich, Santorum, Huntsman or Perry.

But in the final analysis, the nomination will most likely come down to the candidate which the establishment gravitates towards and the candidate that the anti-establishment coalesces around. It is hard to say which two will win their primaries within the primaries. I tend to believe that unless Texas Governor Rick Perry enters the race, Mitt Romney will be the system backed candidate.

Despite fears of Romney being a Benedict Arnold to the conservative cause and having a government-centric mindset, Romney will be a strong candidate. Say what you want, but Romney has a good record. Especially when it comes to management and economics, two things critical to the immediate needs of our nation. He will strike all the right chords and do so in a way that could earn him not just the Republican presidential nomination, but the confidence of Republican voters as well. And in the general election, as the nominee, Mitt Romney has the ability to craft a campaign that can beat President Obama. But Mitt can easily be derailed from his seemingly likely road to the nomination and even the White House, if a during the primaries and caucuses, a certain former Governor winds up becoming the candidate that the ant-establishment forces gravitate toward.

That person is Sarah Palin.

In 2010, she was the needle that the TEA movement used to inject its brew into the G.O.P. with. In 2010, she was the TEA Party’s Cheerleader-in-Chief and the quintessential anti-establishmentarian. And right now, it looks like Palin has the staying power to still be that Cheerleader-in-Chief in 2012.

While people like Herman Cain and Michele Bachmann could prove to be quite formidable, Palin is really the only anti-establishment candidate who has the ability to maintain the enthusiastic support of a majority of TEA movement Republicans while also being able to attract a significant portion of support away from the establishment candidate ……..especially if that ends up being Mitt Romney. In fact, if the primaries within the primaries pit Palin against Romney, I believe Palin wins the nomination.

That  is obviously conjecture. For it to even be possible, Sarah Palin will have to first decide to become a candidate for President in 2012. Additionally, the opportunity for any number of game changing events to take place is endless, and I still contend that the logistics of a well run campaign can make a candidate who looks weak now, seem quite strong later. But what is not conjecture is the fact that the G.O.P. will be encountering a primary within the primary. The anti-establishment forces are firmly ensconced within the G.O.P. and they are ready to do battle again in 2012. For these people, trust does not come with “political experience”. In truth, political experience is a minus to them. For these people, being a “good Republican” is not enough. They want a different type of Republican, the type who is willing to push the G.O.P. establishment and who can demonstrate that they are not willing to play the political games that have gotten us to where we are today. These sentiments are going to certainly produce a divide that will lead not to the usual competition between liberal Republicans and conservative Republicans but rather one between Republican insiders and Republican outsiders.

The final outcome will depend upon on which Republican outsider runs against which Republican insider.

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Sarah Palin Tells Chris Wallace What “President Palin” Would Do

Bookmark and Share   I have stopped predicting who will enter the race for the Republican presidential nomination. After seeing names like Pence, Thune, Barbour, and Huckabee, all shy away from a bid for the nomination and after being convinced that Mitch Daniels would run, only to find out that he won’t, I have stopped trying to figure out what any other potential candidates will do. This is especially so concerning former Alaska Governor and vice presidential nominee, Sarah Palin. Pain is a master at throwing people off guard. She relishes her ability to befuddle the media that tries to follow her every move and she holds her cards close. However, in a rather extensive 25 minute interview with Chris Wallace on Fox News Sunday, Governor Palin sounded like someone prepared to challenge President Obama in 2012.

Palin came across as calm, cool, and in command of the issues. Her opinions were also presented in a way that made her come across as a  populist with a common sense conservative approach to the problems being denied by our President, but understood by the people.

In one of her brightest moments of the interview, Sarah hit Democrats and the President on the economy and said;

“Their [the Democrats]plans for bigger government, more federal control over our private sector, more regulation and burdensome mandates on the people, and on our businesses, its not working and we need to shift gears and change course.  And it is very noble of President Obama to want to stay at the helm and maybe go down with the sinking ship, but I prefer,…… many Americans prefer…… that we start plugging up the holes, powering up the bilge pump, and start to get rid of this unsustainable debt that is sonking our ship.”

Palin sounded most like a presidential candidate when host Chris Wallace asked the former vice presidential nominee, “What would President Palin do, specifically, to boost the economy?

Without any hesitation, Palin simply said that she “would go in the opposite direction of what these Democrats and President Obama have tried in these past 2 ½ years.” But as she continued her answer, at about 4 minutes, 10 seconds into the interview, she stated,

“What President Palin would do is cut the federal budget….making sure that we’re not crowding out private sector investment. And we will cut that spending”

Another telling point came when Wallace pointed out that Palin and Bachmann are both popular TEA Party figures as well as social conservatives and as such, asked Palin  if there was room for both her and Bachmann in the race, or would they split the same base of support between them?

Here , Sarah Palin gave a response that may have offered a “between the lines” interpretation indicative of her sense that she fully expects to become a candidate.

Palin stated;

“No, we have differences too. I have many years of executive experience too, and she has her strengths to add to the race. But no, yeah, there is certainly room. The more the merrier. The more competition, the better.”

That segment of the interview can be found at almost the very end of the video at about 23 minutes, 30 seconds in to it.

While I once leaned towards believing that Palin was not going to run for President, the last month has made me begin to think that she might actually go for it. For a while, she was suspiciously absent from the political scene as she laid relatively low. For me, that was a sign of Palin preparing for something big and trying to not overexpose herself too early. Now, while Palin vigorously argues that she is simply celebrating our American history, her recent bus tour for that  purported purpose, offers up an oddly timed, campaign-like experience, that affords her valuable attention.

Now we can add to that this nearly half hour long interview, an interview in which Palin talks about decisions that would come from a “President Palin”, and discusses room in the race for her and other candidates, so matter-of-factly, that it almost sounds as though she is welcoming candidates to challenge her for the nomination. But I am still not getting my hopes up.

The positive potential that I believe exists in a Palin presidential candidacy is endless. In 2008, I was part of a movement to nominate her for Vice President and became one of the happiest people in the world of politics when she actually was nominated. I believe it was the only smart decision made by John McCain and his campaign. However; I do admit that since then, Palin has been somewhat marginalized by a vindictive, liberal element and relentlessly brutal media. To a degree, her image was damaged and her negative ratings surpassed her positive ratings. But I also believe that if Sarah Palin can transition from playing the role of Republican cheerleader to Republican statesman, she could easily turn those ratings around. All Palin needs to do is come across a bit more Thatcher-like than pop star-like, and she could easily become America’s “Iron Lady”.

This latest interview was a step in that direction.

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Sarah Palin Fundraising and Confirming That She is Still Seriously Considering a Run for President

Bookmark and Share I had been getting a little suspicious of the fact that for Sarah Palin has been conspicuously quiet and out of the spotlight this past month. Her drop from the headlines were beginning to make me suspect that she was getting ready to announce her candidacy for President. You see, I understand that Sarah Palin is unconventional. I also know that she likes to catch people, especially her opponents and those within the lamestream media, off guard. So I began to think that she was quietly readying herself to surprise everyone with the declaration of her candidacy. Much like she surprised everyone with the birth of her son Trig, or her resignation as Governor of Alaska. But no sooner did I begin to pay any attention to these suspicions, Sarah sent out 400, 000 direct mailing pieces that solicited financial donations to her PAC.

In them Palin writes;

“Taking back control of the House last year was only the first step, Now you and I must fix our eyes on 2012. Our goal is to take back the White House and the Senate.”

This does not necessarily mean that Governor Palin is running for President. It could just be her way of preparing to do in 2012, exactly what she did in 2010 to help boost the electoral fortunes of conservatives running for office. Still, the timing is suspect. It came two days after Donald Trump declared he was not running for President and three days after Mike Huckabee took himself out of the running. Huckabee and Trump appealed to the same pools of evangelical and anti-establishment driven voters that comprise Palins base of support. But now with Trump and Huckabee out, Palin has less competition to contend with among those voters. That made the sudden appeal to them for financial support a well timed opportunity for Palin to make a pitch to them that could help consolidate their support behind her.

Then, in addition to the revelation of a new fundraising effort by the Governor, she appeared on Sean Hannitys Fox New program (listen to the interview in the video below this post). Among some of the matters discussed was Sarahs thoughts on her own 2012 run for President. When asked what she intends to do Palin replied Im still assessing the field because I still know its still going to change, the lineup, She added that she was praying about it and looking for others who are ready go rogue within the Republican Party. Governor Palin did say that she wanted to give everyone who is running a good listening and added that she especially wants to give the candidates time to distinguish themselves through the persona lives that they live.

During the interview, Palin indicated that she is not a fan of either politicians or the political process and suggested that she has no intention to put herself on a unneccessary timetable. Palin believes that there is no need for her to make a decision one way or the other yet. In her case that is true. Palin already has significant name ID and seeing as how she is such a contentious figure, she is one of the few potential candidates who can afford to let some go by before she jumps into a spotlight that she has essentially has not been out of for very long. In fact, if Palin does intend to run, a late entry is probably her best bet. For one thing, it gives the media less time to bog her down with coverage that intentionally paints her in a negative light. And for another thing, once the Republican presidential field is established and gets accustomed to its unique composition, if she intends to run, a surprise, late entry into the race would throw the other candidates campaign off balance in a way that would be to Palins advantage.

Still, nothing conclusively indicates that Palin intends to run. However in one characterization of the field, Governor Palin phrased her statement in a way that included herself among the republican contenders for the Republican nomination when she stated. everyone one of us, we bring strengths and weaknesses to the table.

I for one am still leaning more towards Sarah deciding not to run than I am towards her deciding to run. At least not for the Republican or Democrat nomination. But if figures like Mitch Daniels and Rick Perry or the often mentioned Chris Christie, do not somehow end up in the race, I believe Palin could easily see a field with spark in it and decide to become a candidate later rather than sooner.

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Palin Keeps Door to the Presidency Wide Open and Rips the Media a New One at the Same Time

Bookmark and Share In an interview for the BBCs Newsnight, standing along the sidelines of the Alaskan Iron Dog competition which her husband Todd, was competing in, former Alaskan Governor and Vice Presidential nominee Sarah Palin made it clear that the door to a presidential bid is still wide open for her. When asked about a presidential candidacy by the BBCs Jackie Long, Palin said

There is still a lot of consideration that have to be made. We haven’t made up our mind or desired to make an announcement yet as to what it is we will be doing.

Palin stated that one of the big considerations is that Obama has already said he’s going to rake in and spend $1 billion in this race. Money is certainly going to be a consideration. And then just the idea of, will the American electorate be ready for someone a bit unconventional, in terms of a candidate who will call it like she sees it, and who will not be beholden to special interests or such obsessive partisanship as to let a political machine get in the way of just doing what’s right for the voters. said Palin

Sarah Palin granted the impromptu interview even though it was her intention to simply enjoy what she called a uniquely Alaskan event. The Iron Dog competition is the worlds toughest and longest snowmobile race and Todd Palin has been competing in it for the past 18 years and in four them Todd was the winner. But the interview took a bit of a turn when reporter Jackie Long asked What are the criticisms that have hurt you most? One of the big ones that’s thrown at you is that you’re not intellectually capable. Does that sting?

Palin responded with, Who said that?

What followed was an exchange that demonstrated Palins warranted frustration with the liberal bias that the media demonstrates and consistently plagues Palin with;

Long: Lots of criticism about the interviews you have given, the ability to get your head around foreign policy.

Palin: Well, how about the idea of perhaps what some of the media has chosen to portray. Let’s take a couple of examples – and I don’t really want to have to talk politics on one of the best days of our life here in Alaska – but I’ll give you one more answer. Things like, that are misconstrued regarding rumours out there that are still in the media because reporters don’t do their homework, too often, and they don’t set the record straight – though I think it’s their job to set the record straight – rumours like I didn’t know that Africa was a continent, that’s still out there, that’s a lie. Things like I censored books when I was a mayor up here in Alaska, that’s a lie.

[Governor Palin begins to walk away]

Palin: So again if I decide to run we know that we have to put up with a lot of the BS that comes from the media but … It’s not all of you guys but some of you still claim that Trig isn’t my kid. I think that’s an indication of screwed-up media.

Long: You were saying, your favorite from the media? Which one is that?

Palin: Is that Trig is not my child, which is still out there in the media.

Long: How offensive is that? How do you deal with that?

Palin: Would you be offended if someone said you’re child wasn’t your child? It’s offensive. OK, you know what, I’m really really trying to enjoy one of the best days of our lives.

It should be noted that the BBC is an outlet as liberal asNPR is in the United States. It should also be noted that Sarah Palin has repeatedly warned people about the dangers of angering a Mama Grizzly. I now doubt Jackie Long will have another opportunity to discuss politics with Sarah Palin again. Oh well, that’s their loss, not hers.

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